Saturday, September 08, 2012

Mosquito Lagoon Fishing Report 9-2012

Mosquito Lagoon Fishing Report

Hurricane Isaac swung well to the west of us but still brought plenty of rain and high winds to the area. The water levels in the Lagoons rose nearly one foot but have since receded and are holding about six inches higher than they were pre-storm.

The question on may people's minds is what effect, if any, it had on the algae bloom that has been plaguing our region. I travelled over 70 miles through both the Indian River and Mosquito Lagoon this week and saw a wide range of conditions. Some areas are so cloudy you can barely see six inches while others have crystal clear water. The stained water still has fish in some areas but they are certainly harder to see unless they are tailing. The good news is that all the fish I found were happy to eat a variety of lures and flies even with a full moon overhead.

Trout fishing last month was especially productive. Large trout could be found both on the shallow flats and along sandbars. DOA 5.5" CAL tails with a Woodies Rattle landed the most fish.

Bill sight cast to this big trout with a DOA CAL

Average size trout could be hooked by the dozens using jigs and bucktails. Michael and his father enjoyed over an hour of non-stop catching using a 1/4 ounce jighead and a DOA curly tail. Barbless hooks made for quick catch and release action.

One of Michael's many seatrout

If the pinfish or puffers get too thick, switch to bucktails or a castmaster type spoon.

Unfortunately, the big tarpon that had been so prevalent before the storm seem to have moved on. Small tarpon can still be found in the creeks and canals and we have been catching quite a few on regular and tiny TerrorEyz.

The redfish bite this week was excellent. DOA shrimp, Baitbusters, Aqua Dreams pinfish spoon, bendback flies, and crab flies all caught fish. There is a huge variety of baitfish on the flats and the fish are feeding on anything they can get.

This big redfish ate a Baitbuster

During the next two months, the redfish will be very aggressive as they feast in anticipation of winter. This is one of the best times to catch them on topwater lures. Try to avoid using multiple treble hooks, especially on the trophy sized fish that must be released. These hooks can cause lots of damage to the fish. Use a DOA Baitbuster or refit your existing plugs with a single circle hook.

Schools of glass minnows can still be found by looking for diving terns. The ladyfish, jacks, trout, and sailcats can provide some great light tackle and fly fishing fun.

Upcoming Seminars

Saturday September 22, 2012 - 10:00 to Noon (Free Seminar) "Successful Saltwater Flats Angling Tactics" Instructed by Captains Tom Van Horn and Chris Myers. Located at Mosquito Creek Outdoors, 170 South Washington Ave. Apopka

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